Living with a Soy Allergy

Soybeans have become a major part of processed food products in the United States.  Avoiding products made with soybeans can be difficult.  Soybeans alone are not a major food in the diet but, because they’re in so many products, eliminating all those foods can result in an unbalanced diet. 
soy.png image on Symptoms of soy allergy are typically mild, although anaphylaxis is possible.  Soybean allergy is one of the more common food allergies, especially among babies and children. 

Keep in Mind

How to Read a Label for a Soy-Free Diet

All FDA-regulated manufactured food products that contain soy as an ingredient are required by U.S. law to list he word “soy” on the product label.

Avoid foods that contain soy or any of these ingredients:

Soy (soy albumin, soy cheese, soy fiber, soy flour, soy grits, soy ice cream, soy milk, soy nuts, soy sprouts, soy yogurt)
Soybean (curd, granules)
Soy protein (concentrate, hydrolyzed, isolate)
Soy sauce
Textured vegetable protein (TVP)

Soy is sometimes found in the following:

Asian cuisine
Vegetable broth
Vegetable gum
Vegetable starch

Keep the following in mind: