Living with a Peanut Allergy

Allergies to peanuts appear to be on the rise.  One study showed that from 1997 to 2002, the incidence of peanut allergies doubled in children.  Peanuts can trigger a severe reaction.  The severity of a reaction depends on how sensitive the individual is and the quantity consumed.

Some Unexpected Sources of Peanut

pnuts.png image on bigy.com

Keep in Mind

Commonly Asked Questions

Can peanut allergy be outgrown?

Although once considered to be a lifelong allergy, recent studies indicate that up to 20% of children diagnosed with peanut allergy outgrow it.

Can alternative nut butters (i.e. cashew nut butter) be substituted for peanut butter?

Many nut butters are produced on equipment used to process peanut butter, therefore making it somewhat of a risky alternative.  Additionally, many experts recommend peanut-allergic patients avoid tree nuts as well.

How to Read a Label for a Peanut-Free Diet

All FDA-regulated manufactured food products that contain peanut as on ingredient are required by U.S. law to list the word “peanut” on the product label.

Avoid foods that contain peanuts or any of these ingredients

Artificial nuts
Beer nuts
Cold pressed, expeller pressed, or extruded peanut oil
Goobers
Ground nuts
Mixed nuts
Monkey nuts
Nut pieces
Nutmeat
Peanut butter
Peanut flour
Peanut protein hydrolysate


Peanut is sometime found in the follow
African, Asian (especially Chinese, Indian, Indonesian, Thai and Vietnamese), and Mexican dishes
Baked goods (e.g. pastries, cookies)
Candy (including chocolate candy)
Chili
Egg Rolls
Enchilada Sauce
Marzipan
Mole Sauce
Nougat


Other things to keep in mind:

Mandelonas are peanuts soaked in almond flavoring The FDA exempts highly refined peanut oil from being labeled as an allergen. A study showed that unlike other legumes, there is a strong possibility of cross-reaction between peanuts and lupine. Arachis oil is peanut oil Sunflower seeds are often produced on equipment shared with peanuts